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Jennifer Logan

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1
Shaping You
Expires After: Does not Expire

This unit will explore our relationship with social media and will enable students to understand how one’s digital identity is formed. It focuses on ‘who am I?’ both online and offline and interrogates the impacts and influences, both positive and negative, that the media has upon us.

How can we become empowered to take control of our own identity and develop strategies to maintain a healthy and positive outlook? 

Essential information

Unit Information:
This Thrive unit and the lessons are designed for students to work through at their own pace. This is because students may want to spend more time on one particular topic than another. The units are composed of 5/6 lessons in each unit and each lesson can take between 2-4 hours depending on how one paces themselves. There are activities and tasks in each lesson and resources to support learning. Many of the lessons have summative tasks that draw together the learning in each of the individual lessons. 


Important Note
In this Thrive unit, there are many aspects that may directly connect with you. Although very stimulating and thought-provoking, because we are all human, some topics may affect us more than others and may have a deeper meaning for us. For example, exploring our relationship with technology may connect with aspects of our lives that may be more meaningful or have more impact than others.

Exploring one’s own identity can mean that we sometimes relive difficult experiences. This course explores concepts such as Goffman’s ‘Impression Management’ and Cyberbullying. If you have been victim to cyberbullying or negativity online, these topics may be challenging in a variety of ways.
Audrie and Daisy’ is a case study in point. The tragic consequences of the peer abuse that these two young women suffered may be emotionally distressing. 
If you are affected by any of the issues or topics covered in the unit, please contact your counsellor in school or reach out to your pastoral leader. 

Lesson titles:

  1. Social identity (“Me” and the “Digital Me”) – hyperawareness of how we look, etc. “filters” – looking/comparing/hyper-attention
  2. Social Media platforms and their impact on the human psyche (academic)
  3. Ledger of Harms and #MySocialTruth campaign (hands-on)
  4. Resilience, Taking Control, Grit, etc.
  5. Mindfulness and wellbeing

Questions asked in the course

How is our identity formed? How is our digital identity shaped?
What is our relationship with social media?
What is the impact of social media – positive and negative perspectives
What are the invisible harms inflicted by social media that we don’t see? How are tech companies playing on our vulnerabilities?
How can we have agency and take control? What is mindfulness and how can it help?

Please find below the introduction to unit 2: Shaping You

Teachers and Students: You may wish to press the ‘launch’ button below to view in a new window.

Launch Presentation

2
Global Citizenship and Social Entrepreneurship
Expires After: Does not Expire

You’ve likely heard before that the world we live in is “getting smaller every day” or that our society is “more connected than ever.” In so many ways, this is true. We live in a world where technology and business have broken down boundaries and borders in unprecedented ways. What this means is that we can no longer afford to think about ourselves as independent beings focused only on the things immediately around us.

Instead, we need to think of ourselves as global citizens, people who understand the interconnectedness of countries and cultures, and act accordingly to build a better world.

In this unit, we will explore:

  1. What it means to be a global citizen today.
  2. Challenges we may be interested in tackling in the world.
  3. Perspectives on personal and collective responsibility.

Essential information

Unit Information:
This Thrive unit and the lessons are designed for students to work through at their own pace. This is because students may want to spend more time on one particular topic than another. The units are composed of 5/6 lessons in each unit and each lesson can take between 2-4 hours depending on how one paces themselves. There are activities and tasks in each lesson and resources to support learning. Many of the lessons have summative tasks that draw together the learning in each of the individual lessons. 


Important Note
In this Thrive unit, there are many aspects that may directly connect with you. Although very stimulating and thought-provoking, because we are all human, some topics may affect us more than others and may have a deeper meaning for us. For example, exploring our relationship with technology may connect with aspects of our lives that may be more meaningful or have more impact than others. If you are affected by any of the issues or topics covered in the unit, please contact your counsellor in school or reach out to your pastoral leader. 

Lesson titles:

  1. Exploring global poverty and income; exploring and applying key terms;
  2. Systems and Design thinking as a way of solving global problems and applying this to authentic global issues.
  3. Reading the Tao Te Ching and Stoicism comparing different philosophies from East to West, particularly where happiness and wellbeing are concerned.
  4. Studying a great pitch and establishing the crucial elements
  5. Students prepare and write their own entrepreneurial pitch for an ethically sound product/event/ for investors.

Questions asked in the course

Narrowing the Gap
What’s a global citizen? What is global consciousness?
How are we interdependent? Systems Thinking, Leverage Points 
What is design thinking in this context? DJP – 5 stages and how we can explore similarities and differences
Eastern and Western Philosophy – Introduction to Tao Te Ching/Taoism. How can we learn from these approaches in terms of global perspectives and challenges? 
What is social entrepreneurship? Who are social entrepreneurs? What can we learn from them?
Elevator Pitch
Microfinance
Globalization

Please find below the introduction to unit 4: Global Citizenship and Social Entrepreneurship

Teachers and Students: You may wish to press the ‘launch’ button below to view in a new window.

Launch Presentation

3
Making Sense of the World
Expires After: Does not Expire

How our opinions change, and how what we see/hear change us, and the way we see our world. We make sense of the world through our own culture so it makes sense to explore what culture is and our place within it, shaping it and living it.

This unit is all about:

  • How we come to understand the world
  • How our culture shapes who we are
  • Misinformation, conspiracy theories, fake news, politics and the reinforcement of our beliefs on tech platforms

It shows how we are exposed to political manipulation and its effects. One major effect is the inward focus on oneself and the constant repetition of my views across social media. This means that one might never really understand any views, opinions or lives connected to those opinions that differ – or more importantly, that we believe differs from our own. Can we make sense of this very small world where we are always right.

Essential information

Unit Information:
This Thrive unit and the lessons are designed for students to work through at their own pace. This is because students may want to spend more time on one particular topic than another. The units are composed of 5/6 lessons in each unit and each lesson can take between 2-4 hours depending on how one paces themselves. There are activities and tasks in each lesson and resources to support learning. Many of the lessons have summative tasks that draw together the learning in each of the individual lessons. 


Important Note
In this Thrive unit, there are many aspects that may directly connect with you. Although very stimulating and thought-provoking, because we are all human, some topics may affect us more than others and may have a deeper meaning for us. For example, exploring our relationship with technology may connect with aspects of our lives that may be more meaningful or have more impact than others. If you are affected by any of the issues or topics covered in the unit, please contact your counsellor in school or reach out to your pastoral leader. 

Lesson titles:

  1. Conditionality, How we make sense of our world, our assumptions/privileges (to bridge from “Shaping Me” into how that affects our sense of the world)
  2. Misinformation, conspiracy theories, fake news, politics, moving from “me” to “we” – from individual to the political manipulation in its effects.
  3. (Technical – how it happens – algorithms, microtargeting, growth hacking, data scraping, US politics, etc.)
  4. Futures Thinking – framing how we’re living through implications now…what happens if this “runaway system” continues? – practice in implications and downstream consequences (conceptual framework + application)
  5. “Breakdown of shared reality” – perceptiongap.us (hands-on, apply this research locally, actually find out what people think) – could maybe even connect them to MoreInCommon
    1. forming research questions, doing the research, writing up the results/findings
  6. Walking through a “resolution” of finding shared understanding of the world. “The Overton Window”
    1. examples, case studies, etc.
    2. If you were in control of this situation, what would you do next? How would you resolve these gaps?

Questions asked in the course

How our own assumptions affects our sense of the world?
How are we being manipulated by SM?
How do the tech companied manipulate us?
Has Tech and social media started to negatively breakdown our society?
How have they polarized social groups and what is the effect?
What can we do to resolve the situation?
What is happening in my world? research project

Please find below the introduction to unit 3: Making Sense of the World

Teachers and Students: You may wish to press the ‘launch’ button below to view in a new window.

Launch Presentation

4
Testing – Jennifer Logan
Expires After: Does not Expire

Essential Information

  1. This unit runs for ten weeks with four hours of learning per week.
  2. Typically this is broken down into two two hour blocks of learning per week.
  3. Each lesson is typically resourced with a lesson plan, powerpoint, additional reading material, videos and an online quiz or forums for you to participate in.
  4. Sometimes there will be a quiz that will help you review your learning and re-direct you to sources which may help you. The quizzes will also give you experience of the types of questions which will be examined in weeks 5 and 10.
  5. In weeks 5 and 10 there will be online examinations with a revision quiz in the proceeding chapter. More details can be found below.
  6. This unit is worth 2 credits towards the Certificate in Business and Hospitality; the minimum pass percentage is 70%. Further details can be found in the specification.

Unit General Information

The hospitality industry puts people at its very core. Those working in this industry will meet and serve a globally diverse mix of visiting customers, travelers, and tourists from various cultural backgrounds, each with different needs, values, and behaviors. Understanding and meeting these diverse needs will ensure that the welcome and service they receive will be outstanding.

This unit will help to develop learners’ awareness and understanding of visitors and customers from other cultures. Learners will explore examples of different cultures and the impact that stereotyping and making assumptions about different people can have on the way we interact.

Learners will also understand the importance of effective communication with people from different cultures, identifying barriers and focusing on the significance of a positive attitude and appropriate behavior.

Finally, learners will explore the skills and techniques required to ensure effective inter-cultural communication, investigating how verbal, non-verbal communication skills and listening techniques will help them deal with people from different cultural backgrounds.

Upon completing the unit, learners should understand cultural awareness and how this enables them to communicate better, to live, and to work in a multicultural community.


Assessment type Grade percentage toward final grade
Mid-term exam (week 5) 30%
Individual project (due on week 8) 30%
Final exam (week 10) 40%
Total 100%

Detailed learning goals and objectives:

By the end of this course the student will be able to:

Define an understanding of various cultures around the world, including cultural diversity within nations.
Create a guide for fitting multiple countries’ customs and value systems into a world culture outline.
Apply tolerance to other cultures’ values, customs, and lifestyles, while maintaining your own cultural integrity.
Analyze the meaning of rituals and customs from different cultures around the world.
Identify and understand the difference between religion and spirituality and their importance within a cultural framework.
Examine cross-cultural issues and behaviors through exercises, activities, discussions, and assignments.
Explain the complexities of the modern world and think critically about culture and globalization through the use of cross-cultural paradoxes.
Differentiate your own identity in the globalization of the world.
Create an understanding, consideration, and sensitivity to the different cultures in which you may work and travel.