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Kathryn Longstaff

Profile

Courses

1
Unit 7 – Global Cultures
Expires After: Does not Expire

Essential Informtion

1.     This unit runs for ten weeks with four hours of learning per week.
2.     Typically this is broken down into two two hour blocks of learning per week.
3.     Each lesson is typically resourced with a lesson plan, powerpoint, additional reading material, videos and an online quiz or forums for you to participate in.
4.    Every week there will be an opportunitiy for formative feedback through either dialogue in a forum with your teacher and peers OR a quiz. The quiz will help you review your learning and re-direct you to sources which may help you. The quizzes will also give you experience of the types of questions which will be examined in weeks 5 and 10.
5.  In weeks 5 and 10 there will be online examinations, there will be a revision quiz for . Week 5 is a mid-term and week 10 is an end of unit examination. More details can be found below.
6. This unit is worth 2 credits towards the Certificate in Business and Hospitality; the minimum pass percentage is 70%. Further details can be found in the specification.

Unit General Information

Unit aim

This unit provides an introduction to cultural awareness and how to communicate with diverse people from different cultures. The unit is a must for those working, or planning to work, in the hospitality industry, who deal with visitors and colleagues from a range of cultural backgrounds.


Unit introduction

The hospitality industry puts people at its very core. Those working in this industry will meet and serve a globally diverse mix of visiting customers, travelers, and tourists from various cultural backgrounds, each with different needs, values, and behaviors. Understanding and meeting these diverse needs will ensure that the welcome and service they receive will be outstanding.

This unit will help to develop learners’ awareness and understanding of visitors and customers from other cultures. Learners will explore examples of different cultures and the impact that stereotyping and making assumptions about different people can have on the way we interact.

Learners will also understand the importance of effective communication with people from different cultures, identifying barriers and focusing on the significance of a positive attitude and appropriate behavior.

Finally, learners will explore the skills and techniques required to ensure effective inter-cultural communication, investigating how verbal, non-verbal communication skills and listening techniques will help them deal with people from different cultural backgrounds.

Upon completing the unit, learners should understand cultural awareness and how this enables them to communicate better, to live, and to work in a multicultural community.


Assessment typeGrade percentage toward final grade
Mid-term exam (week 5)30%
Individual project (due on week 8)30%
Final exam (week 10)40%
Total100%

Detailed learning goals and objectives:

By the end of this course the student will be able to:

Define an understanding of various cultures around the world, including cultural diversity within nations.
Create a guide for fitting multiple countries’ customs and value systems into a world culture outline.
Apply tolerance to other cultures’ values, customs, and lifestyles, while maintaining your own cultural integrity.
Analyze the meaning of rituals and customs from different cultures around the world.
Identify and understand the difference between religion and spirituality and their importance within a cultural framework.
Examine cross-cultural issues and behaviors through exercises, activities, discussions, and assignments.
Explain the complexities of the modern world and think critically about culture and globalization through the use of cross-cultural paradoxes.
Differentiate your own identity in the globalization of the world.
Create an understanding, consideration, and sensitivity to the different cultures in which you may work and travel.

2
Human Trafficking
Expires After: Does not Expire

‘Issues of migration, trafficking and sex work are peppered with constructs of sexuality, gender and vulnerability, threaded through with categories of victim and agent, consent and coercion, and stirred together in a cauldron by cooks, who are far too many in number.’

Sanghera 2005).

Although human trafficking has become a more publicized issue in the past several years, no cohesive message has emerged.

At the research, policy and advocacy levels, there is a significant amount of concern over issue framing and representation and over the reliability of information on the topic as a whole.


Key questions across this short course:

  1. What do we know about Human Trafficking?
  2. What are Human Rights and Human Wrongs?
  3. How does the media represent human trafficking?
  4. How do popular portrayals influence public perceptions?
  5. Who are the human faces of slavery?

How does the course work?

1.  This course runs for ten hours and can be completed in-person through a teacher facilitator or independently as a self-paced unit.

2. The course is broken down into five discrete sections and has a teacher lesson plan, embedded content and ideas as to how to extend your learning.

3. This course was written in collaboration with the charity Youth Underground based in Geneva. Please visit https://youth-underground.com/ for more information.

3
Institute of Hospitality: Education Membership Scheme
Expires After: Does not Expire

Students at VIE Academy will have student access to the Institute of Hospitality for the full two-year programme.

The Institute of Hospitality is the professional body for managers and aspiring managers working and studying in hospitality, leisure and tourism.

4
SCHOOL DEMO – Unit 1 – Introduction to Business and Hospitality
Expires After: Does not Expire

Essential information:

1.     This unit runs for ten weeks with four hours of learning per week.
2.     Typically this is broken down into two two hour blocks of learning per week.
3.     Each lesson is typically resourced with a lesson plan, powerpoint, additional reading material, videos and an online quiz or forums for you to participate in.
4.    Every week there will be an opportunitiy for formative feedback through either dialogue in a forum with your teacher and peers OR a quiz. The quiz will help you review your learning and re-direct you to sources which may help you. The quizzes will also give you experience of the types of questions which will be examined in weeks 5 and 10.
5.  In weeks 5 and 10 there will be online examinations, there will be a revision quiz for . Week 5 is a mid-term and week 10 is an end of unit examination. More details can be found below.
6. This unit is worth 2 credits towards the Certificate in Business and Hospitality; the minimum pass percentage is 70%. Further details can be found in the specification.

Unit aim

This unit gives learners a general introduction to the hospitality. The unit is split into two sections. The first part looks at the global reach and origin of hospitality; this will also look at current future opportunities and threats. The second half of the unit looks at different types of institutions and the internal functions and processes.


Unit introduction

The hospitality industry is large and varied. It is made up of a commercial sector and a catering services sector. The industry offers many different types of employment and career opportunities.

This unit will provide learners with the opportunity to identify the types of hospitality and catering outlets that make up the industry and outline the different services they offer their customers and users.

The unit will enable learners to investigate job roles available at different levels in the industry and the training and career prospects that are available, as well as providing some knowledge of the work patterns that are expected in a service industry that operates 24 hours a day.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

In order to pass this unit, learners must achieve an average of 70%  as an accumulated average across the four components of the module. Ideally, learners would pass all components at pass level or above but this is not essential.


Assessment Scheme

Formative assessment – weekly quizzes – 100% completion

Summative assessments – as per the table below.

Assessment typeAssessment outlineGrade percentage toward final grade
Mid-term exam90 minutes. This is an online examination through the VLE in week 5. 30%
Written research projectLaunched in week 3 and submitted week 9. The project word count is recommended to bebetween 1400 and 1700 words20%
Oral presentationCreated from the written research project and presented and record in week 9. This is a ten minute presentation with five extra minutes for questions.20%
Final exam105 minutes. This is an online examination through the VLE in week 10.30%
Total100%

Detailed goals and objectives:

1. Know, describe and evaluate the scope and dynamic nature of the travel and tourism industry;
2. Identify and discriminate the origins of the European lodging industry contrasted with another example from around the world;
3. Compare and contrast the effects of the industry on franchising, management contracts, referral organisations, independent and chain ownership.
4. Understand and evaluate the organisation of Destination Tourism, the management and impacts of large event
5. Evaluate the effects of globalisation on the hospitality industry examining recent dynamic world events;
6. Analyse the importance of sustainability
7. Evaluate other hospitality related industry, trends and opportunities
8. Outline the organisational structure and functional areas in commercial and institutional food service operations;
9. Identify the general classifications of hotels, comparing and contrasting the most distinctive features of each, noting the divisions or departments of hotels and explaining the responsibilities of each;
10. Describe the primary function of the rooms division;
11. Recognise and evaluate the origins of the food service industry from around the world;
12. Demonstrate knowledge of Food & Beverage controls;
13. Explain and contrast the fundamental differences between products and services;
14. Explain and research marketing terms and the general functional areas of the marketing and sales division
15. Recognize and examine the importance of Engineering and Maintenance Divisions
16. Evaluate the function of the Security aspects of an operation.
17. Cite and describe opportunities for education, training and career development in the hospitality and business industry.

5
Unit 3 – Communication Studies
Expires After: Does not Expire

Essential Information

1.     This unit runs for ten weeks with four hours of learning per week.
2.     Typically this is broken down into two two hour blocks of learning per week.
3.     Each lesson is typically resourced with a lesson plan, powerpoint, additional reading material, videos and an online quiz or forums for you to participate in.
4.    Every week there will be an opportunitiy for formative feedback through either dialogue in a forum with your teacher and peers OR a quiz. The quiz will help you review your learning and re-direct you to sources which may help you. The quizzes will also give you experience of the types of questions which will be examined in weeks 5 and 10.
5.  In weeks 5 and 10 there will be online examinations, there will be a revision quiz for . Week 5 is a mid-term and week 10 is an end of unit examination. More details can be found below.
6. This unit is worth 2 credits towards the Certificate in Business and Hospitality; the minimum pass percentage is 70%. Further details can be found in the specification.

Unit General Information

Unit aim

This unit aims to introduce learners to the basic principles of the communication process. Learners will discover that the collection and management of business information and the successful communication of that information within the organization is critical for everyone involved.


Unit introduction

Interpersonal skills have long been recognized as essential to personal and professional success. Many people’s careers have fallen apart because of a lack of communication skills. This course is designed to improve abilities to work and socialize with others.

Learners in communication skills will study the basic principles of the communication process and identify its challenges.  This course will explore several models of communication and discuss perception in various settings. It will also cover body language, verbal communication, and written communication for dealing with miscommunication and misunderstanding.

Learners will learn how to apply theoretical communication concepts to practical tasks like collaborating, conflict avoidance and resolution, presenting, public speaking, and negotiating to become more effective communicators.


Grading scheme and learning outcomes

To pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.


Grading Scheme

Assessment typeGrade percentage toward final grade
Mid-term exam (week 5)40%
Project presentation (Week 8)20%
Final exam (week 10)40%
Total100%

General goals and objectives of unit

Skill standardCoverage and range
Speaking and listening 1. Discuss a range of contributions in various contexts, including those that are unfamiliar, and make effective presentations.Analyse complex information and give a relevant, coherent response in an appropriate language.Discuss information and present ideas clearly and persuasively to others.Create an image to support discussion.Contrast contributions to suit audience, purpose, and situation.Create significant contributions to discussions, taking a range of roles and helping to move the discussion forward.
Reading and writing Examine, read, understand and differentiate texts and apply them to gather information, ideas, arguments, and opinions.Identify different types of texts to obtain and apply relevant information.Explain information/ideas from different sources.Identify the purposes of texts and comment on how meaning is conveyed.Assess point of view, implicit meaning, and/or bias.Analyse texts about audience needs and consider suitable responses.
Reading and writing Apply writing skills in a range of texts, including comprehensive written documents, communicating information, ideas, and opinions.Describe information/ideas concisely, logically, and persuasively.Describe information on complex subjects clearly and concisely.Apply a range of writing styles for different purposes.Apply a range of sentence structures, including complex sentences, and paragraphs to organize written communication effectively.

Specific goals and objectives:

By the end of this course the student will be able to:

1 Analyse why good communication skills are important
2 Discuss the basic principles of the communication process
3 Describe how biases and limited perceptions interfere with communication
4 Apply competency in recognizing communication challenges in various social, cultural, and professional settings
5 Apply practical steps and methods to overcome barriers in communication
6 Define nonverbal communication
7 Examine the importance of appearance in the business world
8 Apply methods of relating your topic to a specific audience
9 Assess the importance of listening effectively
10 Describe strategies for improving your nonverbal interpretation and expression skills
11 Examine strategies for communicating with cultural awareness
12 Identify and describe how social relationships vary in handling important communication behaviors and conflict
13 Identify and apply strategies for communicating using technology
14 Describe communicative strategies for effective meeting participation.

6
Making Sense of the World
Expires After: Does not Expire

This unit will study how our opinions change, and how what we see and hear can change us, and the way we see our world – exploring conspiracy theories; misinformation in the media; the algorithms, growth hacking and political manipulation techniques used.

Available September 2021

7
Unit 2 – Principles of accounting
Expires After: Does not Expire

8
Unit 5 – Food and Beverage Management
Expires After: Does not Expire

Different types of finger food

Essential Information

1.     This unit runs for ten weeks with four hours of learning per week.
2.     Typically this is broken down into two two hour blocks of learning per week.
3.     Each lesson is typically resourced with a lesson plan, powerpoint, additional reading material, videos and an online quiz or forums for you to participate in.
4.    Every week there will be an opportunitiy for formative feedback through either dialogue in a forum with your teacher and peers OR a quiz. The quiz will help you review your learning and re-direct you to sources which may help you. The quizzes will also give you experience of the types of questions which will be examined in weeks 5 and 10.
5.  In weeks 5 and 10 there will be online examinations, there will be a revision quiz for . Week 5 is a mid-term and week 10 is an end of unit examination. More details can be found below.
6. This unit is worth 2 credits towards the Certificate in Business and Hospitality; the minimum pass percentage is 70%. Further details can be found in the specification.

Unit aim

This unit will enable learners to understand the dynamic environment of the food and beverage industry and develop skills in analyzing food and beverage operations.


Unit introduction

The unit is designed to help learners plan for quality food and beverage production and delivery through practical application and management activities.

Learners will develop the tools needed to apply objective, constructive, and evaluative skills across various settings and situations.

This unit covers the principles of Food and Beverage Management. Emphasis is placed on the cost control cycle, menu management, quality control, menu design, and F&B operation organization.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

To pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.


Grading Scheme

Assessment typeGrade percentage toward final grade
Mid-term exam (week 5)30%
Individual project:
Create a menu for a specific restaurant Menu Design
Oral Presentation of menu concept (Week 9)
20%


15%
Final exam (week 10)35%
Total100%

General Goals, objectives, and assessment criteria

Learning OutcomesAssessment Criteria
1 Understand different food and beverage production and service categories1.1 discuss the characteristics of food production and food and beverage service categories
1.2 discuss factors affecting recipes and menus for specific outlets
1.3 justify the suitability of systems for particular food and beverage outlet
2 Understand the financial controls used in food and beverage operations2.1 Understand statements in food and beverage operations
2.2 demonstrate the use of cost and pricing processes
2.3 Understand the purchasing process
2.4 Understand the cost of waste and the importance of training
3 Understand the importance of service, marketing, and menu engineering3.1 Demonstrate superior service, using various selling techniques, and psychology
3.1 Discuss marketing techniques to attract the target market
3.2 Justify a Unique Selling Proposition (USP) by practicing menu engineering
4 Be able to design a menu for a restaurant4.1 compile food and beverage menus for a restaurant
4.2 justify the selection and suitability of recipes for menus
4.3 Describe a menu items on a menu based on their recipe

Detailed goals and objectives:

By the end of this course the student will be able to:

Assess the importance of F&B management’s role in relation to Human Resources functions
Assess the importance of proper supervision of F&B staff members
Assess the purpose in periodic menu evaluation
Assess what goes into providing good service to guests and describe a sample service sequence
Create principles of menu development through menu engineering
Create with other Learners to develop a F&B business plan for a commercial outlet
Contrast the different types of Food & Beverage services and events in commercial and non-commercial operations
Differentiate between various facility design, layout and equipment in the food and beverage organization
Evaluate a variety of managerial, production and service positions, roles, organization charts and structures
Evaluate and appraise the trends of the F&B industry for the foreseeable future
Evaluate on how control procedures help managers assess operational results
Evaluate the menu through its pricing, schedules, design and planning methods
Examine the importance of choosing the correct supplier and maintaining the relationships established
Explain and defend how production planning can help food service operations meet and exceed guest expectations
Identify standard portion costs for food and beverage items on the basis of standard recipes; determine standard F&B costs, and pricing menu items

9
Unit 4 – Safety and Production
Expires After: Does not Expire


Essential information:

1.     This unit runs for ten weeks with four hours of learning per week.
2.     Typically this is broken down into two two hour blocks of learning per week.
3.     Each lesson is typically resourced with a lesson plan, powerpoint, additional reading material, videos and an online quiz or forums for you to participate in.
4.    Every week there will be an opportunitiy for formative feedback through either dialogue in a forum with your teacher and peers OR a quiz. The quiz will help you review your learning and re-direct you to sources which may help you. The quizzes will also give you experience of the types of questions which will be examined in weeks 5 and 10.
5.  In weeks 5 and 10 there will be online examinations, there will be a revision quiz for . Week 5 is a mid-term and week 10 is an end of unit examination. More details can be found below.
6. This unit is worth 2 credits towards the Certificate in Business and Hospitality; the minimum pass percentage is 70%. Further details can be found in the specification.

Unit aim

This unit will enable learners to gain understanding of the systems and processes required to produce safe food, and the management activities and controls required to achieve this.


Unit introduction

This unit starts by defining food safety and its importance to hospitality industries and their guests. The science and principles of food hygiene are then explored, together with the main causes of food poisoning and contamination. This knowledge is applied to the study of the systems and processes to produce safe food. 

This unit will also consider employee’s and customers’ safety regarding the risks inerrant to working with food, knives, heavy boxes, fire, electricity, and other dangerous objects. The unit concludes by considering management’s responsibilities and the controls necessary to produce consistently safe food within the relevant legal framework through the HACCP program.

Learners will comprehend various preparation styles and classical cooking while following sanitation standards and learning safety in the kitchen. Basic nutrition and vegetarian eating will complete the course.

Their learning will be underpinned by an analysis of the importance of risk assessment and quality control systems. Learners will be able to construct systems, such as the HACCP, apply them, and understand food hygiene to different hospitality industry situations. They will also consider managers’ roles and responsibilities in producing safe food within the requirements of the current framework of food safety legislation.

Through this unit, learners will develop a clear understanding of the work managers need to do to ensure that they exercise the ‘duty of care’ they have to their guests to ensure food is safeto eat. The development of analytical and problem-solving skills is an important feature of the unit.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

To pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit. The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.

  1. Understand and classify the factors that cause food-borne illness and the contamination of food
  2. Explain the processes that can prevent food spoilage and preserve food quality through the flow of food
  3. Describe the importance of effective prevention systems in the control of food contamination
  4. Be able to construct control and food management systems
  5. Evaluate and prevent risks to employees and guests in a Restaurant, hotel or other F&B facility.

Assessment scheme

Formative assessment – weekly quizzes – 100% completion

Summative assessments – as per the table below.

Assessment typeAssessment outlineGrade percentage toward final grade
Mid-term exam90 minutes. This is an online examination through the VLE in week 5.30%
HACCP projectStudents will have to complete a HACCP series of forms based on a list of ingredients given by VIE academy. Submission will be in week 9.30%
Final exam105 minutes. This is an online examination through the VLE in week 10.40%
Total100%

Detailed goals and objectives

1.      Identify and explain duties of each member in a kitchen-brigade
2.      Recognize the purpose of an instructional recipe
3.      Apply safety procedures in a food production environment
4.      Identify and describe the types of human pathogens that contaminate food product
5.      Understand common pathways by which produce might become contaminated before, during, and after production
6.      Discover the value of your commitment to implementing food safety practices
7.      Describe how to monitor that facilities are maintained, and everyone is following that appropriate health and hygiene practices in food production
8.      Identify & apply rules of up-to-date nutritional principles
9.      Describe basic cooking methods
10.  Assess safety hazards in a kitchen
11. Describe an approach to setting the elements and parameters of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) system, which establishes control of the food operations.
12. Cultural context

10
Unit 1 – Introduction to Business and Hospitality
Expires After: Does not Expire

Essential information:

1.     This unit runs for ten weeks with four hours of learning per week.
2.     Typically this is broken down into two two hour blocks of learning per week.
3.     Each lesson is typically resourced with a lesson plan, powerpoint, additional reading material, videos and an online quiz or forums for you to participate in.
4.    Every week there will be an opportunitiy for formative feedback through either dialogue in a forum with your teacher and peers OR a quiz. The quiz will help you review your learning and re-direct you to sources which may help you. The quizzes will also give you experience of the types of questions which will be examined in weeks 5 and 10.
5.  In weeks 5 and 10 there will be online examinations, there will be a revision quiz for . Week 5 is a mid-term and week 10 is an end of unit examination. More details can be found below.
6. This unit is worth 2 credits towards the Certificate in Business and Hospitality; the minimum pass percentage is 70%. Further details can be found in the specification.

Unit aim

This unit gives learners a general introduction to the hospitality. The unit is split into two sections. The first part looks at the global reach and origin of hospitality; this will also look at current future opportunities and threats. The second half of the unit looks at different types of institutions and the internal functions and processes.


Unit introduction

The hospitality industry is large and varied. It is made up of a commercial sector and a catering services sector. The industry offers many different types of employment and career opportunities.

This unit will provide learners with the opportunity to identify the types of hospitality and catering outlets that make up the industry and outline the different services they offer their customers and users.

The unit will enable learners to investigate job roles available at different levels in the industry and the training and career prospects that are available, as well as providing some knowledge of the work patterns that are expected in a service industry that operates 24 hours a day.


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

In order to pass this unit, learners must achieve an average of 70%  as an accumulated average across the four components of the module. Ideally, learners would pass all components at pass level or above but this is not essential.


Assessment Scheme

Formative assessment – weekly quizzes – 100% completion

Summative assessments – as per the table below.

Assessment typeAssessment outlineGrade percentage toward final grade
Mid-term exam90 minutes. This is an online examination through the VLE in week 5. 30%
Written research projectLaunched in week 3 and submitted week 9. The project word count is recommended to bebetween 1400 and 1700 words20%
Oral presentationCreated from the written research project and presented and record in week 9. This is a ten minute presentation with five extra minutes for questions.20%
Final exam105 minutes. This is an online examination through the VLE in week 10.30%
Total100%

Detailed goals and objectives:

1. Know, describe and evaluate the scope and dynamic nature of the travel and tourism industry;
2. Identify and discriminate the origins of the European lodging industry contrasted with another example from around the world;
3. Compare and contrast the effects of the industry on franchising, management contracts, referral organisations, independent and chain ownership.
4. Understand and evaluate the organisation of Destination Tourism, the management and impacts of large event
5. Evaluate the effects of globalisation on the hospitality industry examining recent dynamic world events;
6. Analyse the importance of sustainability
7. Evaluate other hospitality related industry, trends and opportunities
8. Outline the organisational structure and functional areas in commercial and institutional food service operations;
9. Identify the general classifications of hotels, comparing and contrasting the most distinctive features of each, noting the divisions or departments of hotels and explaining the responsibilities of each;
10. Describe the primary function of the rooms division;
11. Recognise and evaluate the origins of the food service industry from around the world;
12. Demonstrate knowledge of Food & Beverage controls;
13. Explain and contrast the fundamental differences between products and services;
14. Explain and research marketing terms and the general functional areas of the marketing and sales division
15. Recognize and examine the importance of Engineering and Maintenance Divisions
16. Evaluate the function of the Security aspects of an operation.
17. Cite and describe opportunities for education, training and career development in the hospitality and business industry.

11
Business & Hospitality
Expires After: Does not Expire

Certificate in Business and Hospitality Studies

First launch – September 2021


The Certificate in Business and Hospitality studies was developed in collaboration with Montreux International School and is issued by Hotel Institute Montreux (part of the Swiss Education Group). The course is delivered through the VIE Academy online platform with an additional in-person Summer school and can be implemented as the career-related study aspect of an IB school’s Career-related Programme (IBCP) or as stand-alone course alongside other qualifications.


Course description

This Certificate in Business and Hospitality studies is designed to develop student’s foundational knowledge in the fundamentals of business and hospitality. The course develops a range of higher order thinking skills (such as evaluation and reflection) as well as the essential professional skills and opportunities for creative thinking in the context of business and hospitality.

Students learn to apply, analyse and evaluate their knowledge in both their own locations as well as regionally and globally; this is in consideration of the scale of the business organisations from Transnational Corporations to independent businesses.

The course covers the key features of business organization including but not limited to marketing, finance, human resources and operational management. There is a strong emphasis in the course on reflection, honesty and how the student can learn about themselves and their future prospects.

This is developed through scenario-based learning and understanding the real-life applications of knowledge through creative individual projects in every unit. Throughout the course there are essential expectations of ethical decision-making grounded by secure knowledge and understanding of local and global contexts, health and safety and finance.


Course Objectives

  1. Develop a holistic view of the scope and dynamic nature of the hospitality and business.
  2. Encourage strategic and critical thinking about structures, contracts, financial operations, and marketing approaches of the hospitality industry.
  3. Examine the importance of exploring business issues from different cultural and ethical perspectives.
  4. Apply knowledge about the importance of health and safety regulations, internal procedures, and biology to customers and guest’s safety.
  5. Critique the nature and significance of the effects of globalization on the hospitality industry examining recent dynamic world events.
  6. Develop awareness of the importance of environmental, social, cultural and ethical factors in the actions of individuals and organizations.
  7. Develop an understanding of the importance of societal trends, geopolitical changes, global events (such as pandemics) for the future of the hospitality & tourism business environment.

12
Finance & Enterprise
Expires After: Does not Expire

This course provides students with an introduction to the finance and investment industry with a specific focus on a global perspective. Students will explore the key financial principles and products including assets and markets, equities, bonds, derivatives, investment funds, loans, mortgages and life assurance.

The course is contextualized within broader economic environment in which the industry operates and looks at how economic activity is determined and managed in different economic and political systems. In addition students will study financial regulation focusing on financial crime, insider trading and market abuse, gaining a greater understanding of ethical behaviour and integrity.

This programme will cover the following units:

·      Introduction to Finance & Investment

·      The Global economic environment 

·      Introduction to financial assets and markets 

·      Understanding Equities 

·      Understanding Bonds

·      Understanding Derivatives

·      Investment funds 

·      Financial regulation and Financial crime

13
Gender Equality Around the World
Expires After: Does not Expire

This unit explores the sustainable development goals and focuses on SDG 5 – gender equality and its impact on the success of all other SDG’s.   

Available January 2022